Tag Archives: Growth management

19 (yes 19!) reasons to work with an Executive Coach

As a professional Executive Coach and Mentor, probably the one question I am asked most often is, “What would executive coaching do for me and my business?”.

Well, to help answer that question, here’s a simple list of just some of the ways executive coaching can make a difference to you, your career, and your business:

  1. Completely bespoke solutions: a professional Executive Coach will work with you to develop solutions that are as unique as you are, ensuring they completely ‘connect’ with you and so deliver the results you seek
  2. Clarity: an Executive Coach will help you find far greater clarity in the areas you work on together
  3. Focus: your Executive Coach is fully equipped with the tools and experience to improve your focus in the areas you choose, significantly improving your performance
  4. Ownership and responsibility: working with you to develop a thoroughly defined ‘picture’ of the scope of your ownership and responsibilities, and how you interact with them
  5. Direction: by bringing together many of the elements listed here, your Coach will help you develop a clearer direction that ‘fits’ with you in the best way possible
  6. Self-awareness and awareness of others: your coaching sessions will significantly enhance your self-awareness, and your awareness of others, improving your understanding of how you, and especially your emotional states, influence your behaviour, and how you observe, interpret, and respond to those same states in others
  7. Confidence: your Coach works with you to improve your confidence by bringing together all the elements listed here
  8. Purpose: your Coach will help you understand what your purpose is – what you are here to do (or be)
  9. Improving your leadership: your leadership is a constantly moving, developing skill set which your Coach will help you understand and build on in the best way for you
  10. Improving your decision-making: every great leader is a great decision-maker too, and utilising coaching to establish and understand the decisions you make, will deliver decisions of much greater quality
  11. Empowering your beliefs: our beliefs can drive us forward, but also hold us back too. You Executive Coach will help you understand your beliefs, how they influence your life and work, and what you can do to work ‘with’ them rather than being held back by them
  12. Results: your Executive Coach will facilitate you achieving genuine, worthwhile results!
  13. Reflection and learning: your coaching sessions will allow you a dedicated, completely confidential space to reflect and learn
  14. Motivation and action: when you have greater confidence in your direction and understanding, you feel more motivated to take the actions required to move you forward. Coaching clearly facilitates this
  15. Values: eliciting your core values (the fundamental, life-long ‘building blocks’ that make you the person you are) could well be one of the most valuable exercises you undertake with an Executive Coach
  16. Vision: one of the key elements a professional Executive Coach can do for you, is to help you develop and fine-tune your vision
  17. Emotional support, and truth/honesty: your Coach will help you take a long, ‘hard’ look at yourself, but in a place where such ‘deep’ exploration can be undertaking in a thoroughly supportive ‘space’
  18. A confidential ‘sounding board’: the very best leaders and executives all need someone who they can confidentially share anything with, collaborate on sharing their knowledge and experience, and who is outside of their family and social circles
  19. Confidential and dedicated support: for improving your knowledge, skills, experience, abilities, and understanding

Remember, a professionally qualified and experienced Executive Coach possesses an extensive range of tools, experiences, and abilities that are all specifically focused on working closely with you in delivering the unique solutions that move you forward with clarity, focus, direction and motivation.

N.B.: one recommendation I would always make is for you to always, always, always choose an Executive Coach who is genuinely professionally qualified. Take a look at my blog article ‘Choosing the best business coach for you’, which contains tips for choosing a great coach.

To find out more about how I work with business executives, leaders and owners to maximise their potential and success, and the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

General Election 2017: the key leadership lessons

“Well, how did that happen?”, appears to be the most common response to the outcome of our recent General Election.

Compared to the widespread expectations when the Election was called of what the result would be, what leadership lessons can be learned from the campaign?

Rather than analyse what worked and what didn’t in the tiniest detail, let’s look at just three essential (and significant) learning points:

1) Everything that glitters etc, etc…

Firstly, if someone is telling you that everything looks certain, that you’ll ‘win’ easily, that you’re set for huge gains, never, ever believe them – and I really do mean never!

Straightaway consult others, especially those of opposing views to yours, and build a thoroughly complete ‘picture’ of the environment in which you are competing – something every world class leader I have ever met does habitually. Then trust your knowledge, experience, and, perhaps most importantly, your intuition in making your strategic decisions.

Remember, as soon as you enter into any formal competitive environment, including elections and business (e.g.: bidding processes), the gaps between the competitors will narrow, and, usually, continue to do so over the entire ‘competition’.

So, make it your decision, not someone else’s.

 

2) The E-word rules, OK?

The whole point of being in a leadership position if that you are there to lead others! (I know that sounds obvious, but you would be surprised how many ‘leaders’ don’t realise, or forget this!)

This means, perhaps most fundamentally in leadership, is that you engage those you are leading, integrating them into your plans.

In the Election, just look at which party leader proved to be the most engaging with the electorate, and what happened to their share of the vote as a result (not least, as they were almost written off when the Elections campaign began).

Exactly the same applies to any leadership position in any other sector, and especially in business: as a leader, you must be able to thoroughly engage everyone you are working with (team members, peers, superiors, etc).

 

3) Simplicity trumps complexity. Every time!

As a leader, you need to always be able to communicate quickly, easily, and effectively with everyone.

Remember this simple ‘communication equation’:

Simple + clear = effective

Keep it simple (use simple words), and keep it clear (use easy to understand language), and it will be effective.

During the Election campaign, which part leader did this best?

The results speak for themselves!

So, if you ever have to ‘win’ in a challenge with a competitor, and as a leader you will from time to time, remember these three simple leadership lessons:

  1. Everything that glitters is…usually too good to be true!
  2. The E-word (‘engagement’) rules, OK?
  3. Simplicity trumps complexity. Every time!

To find out more about how I work with business executives, leaders and owners to maximise their potential and success, and the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

Decision-making (part 2): when design influences our decisions

How much does the design of the world around us influence our decisions?

What would you say?

After all, everything that isn’t natural is designed, so we are surrounded by (for want of a better word) ‘unnatural’ influences, whether we like it or not.

Here’s an example to help explain what I am talking about:

Our Driving Licences include a photo of the holder, and have to be renewed every 10 years. At the time of renewal, we are also given the option to enrol on to the Organ Donation Register.

Take a look at the graph below. It shows the rate of organ donation enrolment at Driving Licence renewal, for a number of European countries:

As you can see, there are two distinct groups: a group with a relatively low enrolment rate (on the left), and a group with a relatively high enrolment rate (on the right).

You will have spotted that the differences between the groups are significant. So what is the cause?

Could it be, for example, to do with an individual’s beliefs, or could it be for cultural reasons?

After all, by the time we donate our organs, we are no longer ‘here’ to be concerned by it.

Even countries that you might argue are culturally similar have very different enrolment rates:

Denmark (4.25%) vs Sweden (85.9%)

Germany (12%) vs Austria (99.98%)

Netherlands (27.5%) vs Belgium (98%)

and, depending on your view of cultural similarities across Europe:

UK (17.17%) vs France (99.91%)

But, what has caused these differences?

Well, it turns out that it was almost entirely caused by the design of the renewal form.

The group on the left, with the low level of organ donation enrolment, had a form which included a box similar to this:

As we have all done when filling in a form, they didn’t check the box, so didn’t join the Register.

The group on the right, however, the group with much higher enrolment, had a slightly different box on their form. Something like this:

Just as the lower enrolment group did, the people completing this form still didn’t check the box, but, in this case, they joined the Register!

It really was as simple as that!

But, why didn’t they check the box in the first place?

Could it be because they considered the decision to enrol as, for example, trivial, or too easy, that it was simple, or could it be that they didn’t really care that much about it?

In fact, it was the opposite of these things.

They found the decision to be extremely important, very difficult indeed, highly complicated, and they actually cared so much about it that they couldn’t actually decide on which decision they wanted to make.

As a result, they just left it to the ‘default’ decision that was being made for them…and how many of us have done exactly the same?

So, there you are. Design can, and frequently does influence our decisions!

Along with a number of other influences (which I shall keep for future blog posts), our intuition, which we rely on heavily when we make decisions, is being led astray in a consistent, predictable, and repeatable way by the world around us, so much so that we do not always clearly understand the decisions we want to make.

A thank you: I’d just like to give a special mention to Dan Ariely, Professor of Psychology and Behavioural Economics at Duke University, whose work and research has been of great inspiration in writing these articles.

To find out more about how to develop your decision-making, and the the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

Decision-making (part 1): the ‘zero’ option isn’t useless

How often do you look at the choices in front of you, and think, “What’s the point of that (option)?”

We come across ‘zero’ options – the ones that obviously nobody would choose – surprisingly often.

But, what is the point of them? If they really are ‘useless’, what are they doing to our decision-making?

Well, take a look at this subscription offer run by The Economist in 2009:

In a controlled test, 100 MIT students were asked to express a preference – see the results shown above.

So, if the print only option is a ‘zero’ option (i.e.: nobody chooses it), what is the point of including it in the list?

Or, to put it another way, what would happen if it wasn’t there?

So, the print only option was removed from the list and another 100 MIT students were asked to choose from the revised list, with the following results:

As you can see, when there were only two choices, what was originally the most popular has become the least popular, and vice versa, meaning the ‘zero’ option was actually having an influence on the choices the students were making.

In fact, it wasn’t actually a ‘zero’ option at all. Just because nobody chose it, doesn’t mean it had no influence.

What was happening was the only ‘zero’ element of that option was that nobody chose it.  When it was present, it’s influence on the choices that were made – predominantly cognitive decisions – was important.

What it was actually doing was encouraging the readers to choose the ‘best nearest’ option that was closest to the (obviously) ‘zero’ option. In other words, it helped the readers to make their minds up!

So, next time you see a ‘zero’ option, or if you decide to include one in your own proposals, remember that they’re far from useless after all! They actually help the reader make a decision.

A thank you: I’d just like to give a special mention to Dan Ariely, Professor of Psychology and Behavioural Economics at Duke University, whose work and research has been of great inspiration in writing these articles.

To find out more about how to develop your decision-making, and the the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

Business is business, but cash is King!

‘Money’, as the old saying goes, ‘is a dirty word!’ 

There’s an old saying in business which, in my time at a very large German corporate I used to visit some or our joint ventures and hear Lord X (to keep him anonymous) bellow often (and usually whilst banging the boardroom table), “Business is business, but cash is King!”.

It’s one of the most valuable pieces of ‘advice’ I have ever had the good fortune to receive.

One of the most valuable ways you can focus your efforts to build your business success is to ensure you have healthy cashflow.

In other words, make sure you get paid the right amount on time, by the right people, at the right price, and that you do the same.

Very often I find myself working with companies, of all sizes, to strengthen their cashflow. In many cases the bulk of it is easy to put right: just get your customers to pay up on time.

However, a great many cashflow issues are created because we have a habit of being a bit ‘too British’. What I mean is that many business owners and leaders tend to avoid talking about money….and end up paying the consequences.

If someone owes you money on a certain date, then they should be paying you on that date. Fact!

Obviously, the intricacies of building a strong cashflow go far beyond just getting people to pay on time, but this probably has the single biggest impact.

So, here are some tips for developing and strengthening your cashflow – easy to do, and great for your business:

  1. Know your customer! Obvious isn’t it? Be clear who you’re trading with, what type of organisation they are, what assets they have, and, for peace of mind, take out a credit check too (#BizTip: if you have business banking services at your bank, these checks can often be obtained free or at nominal cost). More detail and knowledge is better than less.
  2. Minimise your risk. Seek up front part-payment if necessary, ensure your terms and conditions make it clear you own the goods, or may withdraw/turn off the services in the event of late or non payment. If necessary, seek a written guarantee from the directors/owners.
  3. Make sure you have fit-for-purpose terms and conditions, covering payment, at what point full ownership is transferred, guarantees and liability. If you need to update your terms, many local law firms can do this at a sensible cost, or speak business support groups for guidance.
  4. Keep up to date! Even before payment is due, make it clear to your customer when payment is due and that you know it’s due. If you are being paid late, you are effectively funding their business (which is what banks are for). You’re running a business, not a bank, so remind and chase that payment. It’s your money, after all!
  5. If you do need to enforce your terms, or take legal action, be decisive and clear about your aims and objectives in doing this. Consider reasonable offers if necessary. Remember you’re running a business so paying legal fees, and using up valuable time and effort in chasing late payment is taking you away from the customers who you know and trust.

Sir Clive Woodward, World Cup winning England rugby coach, used the acronym T-CUP: Think Clearly Under Pressure.

When the pressure on you, and your cashflow issues grow because of late payment, think clearly about how you will resolve it, and take action.

 

To find out more about improving your focus, your cashflow, as well as the benefits of professional coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

There’s always a reason not to, isn’t there? Really? I mean, REALLY?

Over the last 17 years, I have delivered a wide range of professional coaching, mentoring and consultancy services to the leadership and management of over 250 different businesses across the UK and Europe. From long-established multi-national corporates, to brand new single person start-ups, and many variations in between.

I have lost count of how many times some clients, and prospective clients alike, have said they’re “too busy”, or that they “need to sort a few things out first”, or “I’ll get back to you”, “School holidays/Christmas/etc is coming up”, etc, etc, as reasons for not doing important tasks.

You have come across something similar, I expect? Perhaps it even rings a few bells with you too?

But what is the main cause of this? What makes so many people feel they’re “too busy”, and so on?

The irony is that this is exactly one of the areas I work on with clients to improve their leadership, and grow their businesses.

So, how come there’s always a reason not to?

Easy!

It’s because their focus is not where it provides the most benefit, either for the individual or their business or, most often, both!

Now, focus is often a tricky thing to get right – there are so many things to do, so many changing priorities, and, dare I say, too many easy reasons to put more important tasks off!

So, how can focus be improved?

I’m a keen believer in trying to develop and deliver simple solutions to issues like this, simply because simple ‘works’. Complicated (usually) doesn’t!

So, when it comes to improving your focus, try these simple steps:

  1. Do or Delegate: whatever you come across, either do something with it yourself, or delegate it to someone else. Do not put it off until later!
  2. If it isn’t indispensable, it’s useless: this is one of the best time management tips I have ever been given. If you really can’t do without it, keep it. If you can do without it (no matter in how small a way), you don’t need it. Be firm in making your decision.
  3. Prioritise. Prioritise. Prioritise. Make a weekly and daily list of what you need to to do, prioritise it (click here for a simple way to prioritise any list), and do it in order of highest priority first!

To find out more about improving your focus, and other benefits of professional coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

The EASY way to prioritise ANY list

In my experience, one of the things people in the business world find most challenging is how to prioritise.

Theoretically, it should be easy. In reality, it often ends up in confusion, unnecessary complication, and, worst of all, delays in getting things done.

So how can you prioritise you ‘to-do’ list easily?

Here’s a simple method:

  1. make a list of your ‘to-dos’
  2. number the list, in numerical order, top to bottom
  3. decide on one prioritising question. e.g.: which needs doing first?
  4. compare all of the items on the list with all of the others, see below
  5. best of all, it takes justa  couple of minutes!

How to compare every item on the list with each other

Let’s say there are 5 items on the list.

Start with item 1, and compare it with item 2, asking (e.g.) ‘which needs doing first, 1 or 2?’. Put a tick against whichever item ‘wins’.

Do the same again, comparing 1 with 3. Then 1 with 4. Then 1 with 5. Each time, put one tick against which item ‘wins’.

You have now compared item 1 with each of the others.

Now move to item 2, and compare it with item 3 (you do not not need to compare it with item 1 as you have already done so above), and add the relevant tick. then compare 2 with 4, then with 5.

Now move to item 3, and compare it with item 4 (you do not not need to compare it with items 1 or 2  as you have already done so above), and add the relevant tick. then compare 3 with 5.

Then compare 4 with 5.

List Prioritised!

You now have a list of 5 items, and the number of ticks against each quickly and easily shows you the priority – the more ticks, the higher the priority.

It’s then easy to rearrange the list in order of priority.

TIP: you may end up with one or more items on your list with no ticks at all. So, these are obviously of a lower priority when compared with the other items on your list. However, it may also be a sign that they might not have any priority for you at all (double-chek by adding them to a list of different items, or by using a different prioritising question).

To find out more about how professional coaching, mentoring and consulting can improve your productivity, thinking, and decision-making, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2017. All rights reserved.

Choosing the best business coach for you

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Let’s face it. Choosing a good coach to work with you and your business is a potential nightmare!

After all, what makes a good coach?

How can you be sure you’re getting a genuine professional?

How can you minimise the risks in choosing one and what should you expect from them?

Whilst none of these have straightforward answers, there are a few things you can do to minimise any potential risks, and dramatically improve how you find and select not only a good coach, but a great one.

To start with,  remember this ‘golden rule’: always, always, always do your research before you choose your coach.

In doing that research here are a few simple steps to focus on:

1) Ask the ‘coach’, “What is “coaching”?”

Can they clearly and simply explain the key differences between coaching, mentoring, counselling, training, teaching and telling?

TIP: make sure you know what “coaching” actually is. If you’re not sure, click here to ask me for a definition.

If the ‘coach’ cannot give a detailed and correct answer to this simple question, move on to your next candidate straightaway.

N.B.: most so-called ‘coaches’ cannot answer this question correctly!

 

2) Are they genuinely professionally qualified in coaching?

It is estimated that over 85% of so-called ‘coaches’ are not professionally qualified in coaching.

Alarming, isn’t it?

So, beware! An unqualified ‘coach’ could do untold damage to your development and the success of your business. It also means they probably do not have professional indemnity insurance for delivering coaching services (I am yet to come across an insurance provider who wouldn’t require a professional coaching qualification).

Sadly, there are a vast number of flaky (to be diplomatic) ‘coaching courses’ out there, almost all of which are well below acceptable professional standards, let alone being robust enough to be genuine qualifications.

Establishing the credibility of any ‘coach’s’ professional qualification can be tricky, but a few simple checks can make a big difference and bring much greater peace of mind to the selection process.

In my view, the best professional coaching qualifications in the UK are obtained from UK universities and management schools. Clarify whether the qualification was classroom-based (good) or distance learning (not so good).

There are also a small number of professional bodies and dedicated coaching qualification providers who deliver good quality qualifications. e.g.: the CIPD (predominantly HR focused, for delivering coaching within an organisational development programme), the International Coaching Federation (a dedicated coaching skills qualification provider who has improved the quality of their programmes considerably in recent years), Eurocoach (again another dedicated coaching skills qualification provider who is gaining in reputation for the quality of coaches they produce), to name but a few.

Note: many ‘coaches’ have completed in-house coaching skills programmes from when they were working within large organisations. Be careful! These are rarely genuine qualifications or aimed at developing coaching skills to a professional standard (of course, there are a few exceptions). These programmes are usually designed for the ‘coach’ to be working within the organisation, rather than being independent. If your preferred ‘coach’ has been trained in this way, establish how they have adapted to being a professional independent coach before going further.

(TIP: if you’re thinking about qualifying as a coach, remember the simple ‘rule’ of coaching qualifications – on the whole, you get what you pay for!).

 

3) Check-out their specific post-qualification coaching experience.

It may sound like a contradiction, but the professional qualification does not ‘make’ the coach in the fully rounded, competent professional sense.

It is their post-qualification experience that really defines a coach’s credibility and expertise as a genuine coach.

When I qualified as a coach back in 2004, I completed around 150 hours of post-qualification coaching with a very wide range of business clients before I felt I had reached a level of professional competency and ‘rounded’ coaching ability required in a professional, independent coach.

All professional coaches will understand the need to continuously and pro-actively review and develop their skills and abilities throughout their careers, learning from every coaching session they deliver. As such, an experienced coach tends to work in specific areas of delivery that reflects their skills and experience (as this will provide greater empathy with the subject matter). In my case, for example, I concentrate on working with business clients around their leadership, business strategy and growth management requirements.

So, look for a genuinely qualified professional coach with a delivery focus in the areas you are seeking to change or develop.

Remember, it is not unusual to enlist the expertise of more than one coach in order to make sure their collective expertise is aligned with all of your requirements.

 

So, that’s it!

Three, hopefully, simple steps to help you find the best coach for you.

Just remember to do your research first.

If you’re unsure about anything here, or if you have any questions about coaching, please get in touch – I’m here to help.

To find out more about how I work with business executives, leaders and owners to maximise their potential and success, and the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2015-17. All rights reserved.

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Real Businesses Aren’t Clones!

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In my line of work, I come across many young businesses with great potential who find themselves in need of some good, solid business advice, often as a result of having tried to follow a ’business programme’ of one description or other.

In my experience, and having advised well over 200 businesses to date, every business is as unique as the people within it. They’re individual, different, with distinctly differing needs and requirements.

So what makes so many great, especially young businesses get tempted to follow these mass-market ‘growth programmes’, or ‘business builders’? The businesses are not ‘clones’ after all, yet they often sign-up to a ‘system’ that is only designed to create clones.

Therein lies the paradox – a system approach, especially for those who don’t have the knowledge, skills and experience to run a business, especially a growing business, feels like a ‘safe’, comfortable place to be where so much is done for you and all you have to do is ‘follow’. It’s just easier, and usually sounds like a ‘good deal’. But they also know they need to deliver the unique requirements of their business. These two things, in simple terms, just don’t go together.

Don’t get me wrong, there are some basic processes that are more or less the same in every business, accounting records for example, but these are just a tiny part of the full business activity.

If you want to create what I call a ‘plastic box’ business (where every business is churned out exactly the same) then, by all means, surround yourself with clones and ‘plastic boxes’ where you will all be treated exactly the same as all the others there, given exactly the same ‘tools’ and all the same processes. But I have only ever met one business owner who does – who actually owned a business that made plastic boxes!

You and your business are not clones, so don’t risk being treated like one!

I readily understand that leading and running a business is difficult. I’ve been doing it for over 27 years and I am still constantly learning. But around 80% of UK business closures are fundamentally caused by poor leadership and business management (source: ONS).

If you think about it, most people create a business either because they have had a great idea, or they are really good at something. Not because they are good at running a business.

Developing the knowledge, skills and experience to build and run a successful, growing business can, and frequently does seem daunting to say the least. These ‘programmes’ do not, and cannot suddenly create the ability and understanding to meet the unique requirements of the business when they are repetitively dishing out the same thing to everyone ‘parrot-fashion’.

The solution?

Firstly, do some research as to what type of help you need – coaching or mentoring (yes, there is a big difference), training, consulting, and so on. These are all different and meet different needs. Set aside a proper budget too!

Secondly, clearly establish the proven credibility of any adviser you consider – ask for recommendations, checkout their LinkedIn profile, especially look at their experience and its relevance to what you need, double-check their qualifications and credentials (I cannot emphasise how important it is for any bona fide coach to be properly qualified – ideally they are qualified through a UK university or one of the more respected UK professional institutes). Remember, lots of experience does not mean they make a good mentor!

Thirdly, get to know them. Any business adviser worth their ‘salt’ will happily put in the effort to clearly establish whether and how you can work together. It’s as important for them as it is for you. After all, you may well be working together for some time so it’s vital you have that strong relationship.

Finally, remember that the very best business advisers, no matter what ‘badge’ they are wearing, will provide you with exactly and exclusively what you need for your business – including the things you may not want to hear! But, trust me, this dedicated approach is the only genuine way to move your business forward successfully and enduringly.

To find out more about how I work with business executives, leaders and owners to maximise their potential and success, and the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2014-2017. All rights reserved.

They’re Flat on the Bottom for a Reason!

The importance of keeping ‘grounded’ should not be underestimated…

Staying ‘grounded’. Its a phrase most of us have some understanding of what it means, but how many of us actually make the effort to work out just how ‘grounded’ we really are?

For me, working in the fields of professional executive coaching, mentoring and consulting is one continuous learning experience (no pun intended). It also tends to pull you in all sort of different directions, often at the same time. Occasionally, perhaps after a particularly crazy month or two, I am left with a sensation of ‘looseness’ – that my ‘grounding’ has come unstuck.

In coaching, a professional coach has a responsibility to the client to retain neutrality and I have found that the better my ‘grounding’, the easier it is to maintain and deliver that neutrality to the highest quality.

As for how I keep my ‘grounding’ or even ‘re-ground’ myself, I find that asking myself some reflective, challenging questions works for me (I guess it’s the coach in me coming out). Perhaps they might work for you too?

So, below are some of the questions that I make sure I answer (obviously, you can add your own too).

Here we go (not in any particular order):

What is the likely outcome of my current focus?

How am I?

What am I doing to support my core values?

What, that is completely within my influence, should I change and how?

What am I responsible for and to whom?

How open am I being to the questions the universe is asking of me, and how am I responding?

What positive contribution(s) have I made today/this week/etc?

If I re-ran today/this week/etc, what would I change?

What have I learnt from today/this week/etc?

How do I know (for sure) who I really am?

Obviously, there could be many, many more!

So, you see it’s not just those things on the end of your legs that help keep you grounded.

Although, your feet really are flat on the bottom for a reason!

To find out more about how I work with business executives, leaders and owners to maximise their potential and success, and the benefits of professional executive coaching and mentoring, particularly in developing leadership, strategy and growing a business, please contact me:

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2014-2017. All rights reserved.