So, just what is Emotional Intelligence? (part 1)

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Whilst there is a great deal of interest in Ei, there is also a great deal of confusion about exactly what it is and what its component parts are.

In much of my work, especially in the fields of coaching and mentoring, I employ the many facets and benefits of Emotional Intelligence (‘Ei’), including utilising powerful Ei profiling tools for individuals and teams in developing leadership and business performance, and in recruiting key personnel.

The good news is that after almost 100 years of research and study, Ei is now well understood to the extent that we know how to measure it (through all of the scales mentioned in this article), change it, and develop it. Ei is continuously developable – you can never have too much of it!

The benefits of developing your Ei are likely to deliver positive impacts in almost every area of your professional and personal lives. Literally!

So, just what is Emotional Intelligence?

In the first part of this article (final part next month) I shall look at the ‘core’ elements of Ei, and their key components, and those of our self management (which is a part of our ‘personal’ or ‘intra-personal’ intelligence).

Here goes…

Firstly, a simple definition of Ei:

“The awareness of how our attitudes and feelings influence our behaviour.”

The first of these, and the most fundamental ‘building block’ of Ei is our attitudes: how we balance our self regard (how well we accept and value ourselves ‘warts and all’), with our regard for others (how well we accept and value others (as distinct from approving of them)), aiming to achieve and develop high levels in both.

Self regard ‘feeds’ into how well you can develop your regard for others.

The attitudes part of Ei supports and helps us develop the ‘feelings’ part of Ei.

This ‘feelings’ part of Ei is about how aware we are of the physical influence our feelings and intuitions have on us, in balance with how aware we are of the feelings of others and, as with the regard ‘scales’, the higher our levels of both the better.

One important thing to remember is that whilst the regard scales provide the ‘building blocks’ of Ei, these awareness scales are where the ‘core’ or ‘root’ of Ei lies. i.e.: your Ei is developed from here.

The third and final element I will cover here is that of ‘self management’: a combination of ‘scales’ that collectively influence ‘how you are’ or, to put it another way, the relationship wyou have with yourself.

This self management part of Ei is made up of six elements (‘scales’):

Emotional Resilience: how effectively you ‘bounce back’ when things don’t go well for you

Personal Power: to what extent you feel you are in charge and have sole responsibility for what happens in your life

Goal Directedness: the degree to which you align your behaviour to your long-term goals

Flexibility: the degree with which you adapt what you think and how you behave to life’s changing circumstances

Connecting with Others: how well you create and develop meaningful relationships with others

Authenticity: the degree to which you invite others to trust you, through being reliable principled, consistent and ‘known’ (N.B.: this does not mean you have to tell everyone your ‘life story’)

In part 2: the relationship management scale of the Ei model

(based on the Ei Model developed by JCA Global Limited, and the book “Emotional Intelligence @Work” by Jolyon Maddocks)

To find out more about Ei, Ei profiling, or developing any aspect of Ei and its uses in coaching and mentoring, please get in touch – I’m here to help.

t: 01242-672440

e: click here

© Adrian Malpass 2016. All rights reserved.